Signs & Symptoms of Depression

What Is Depression?

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. Also called major depressive disorder or clinical depression, it affects how you feel, think, and behave and can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems. You may have trouble doing normal day-to-day activities, and sometimes you may feel as if life isn't worth living.


More than just "the blues", depression isn't a weakness and you can't simply "snap out" of it. Depression may require long-term treatment. But don't get discouraged. Most people with depression feel better with medication, psychotherapy, or both. To be diagnosed with depression, the symptoms must be present for at least two weeks.


Signs & symptoms

If you have been experiencing some of the following signs and symptoms most of the day, nearly every day, for at least two weeks, you may be suffering from depression:

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood

  • Feelings of hopelessness, or pessimism

  • Irritability

  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness

  • Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities

  • Decreased energy or fatigue

  • Moving or talking more slowly

  • Feeling restless or having trouble sitting still

  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions

  • Difficulty sleeping, early-morning awakening, or oversleeping

  • Appetite and/or weight changes

  • Thoughts of death or suicide, or suicide attempts

  • Aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems without a clear physical cause and/or that do not ease even with treatment

Depression symptoms in older adults

Depression is not a normal part of growing older, and it should never be taken lightly. Unfortunately, depression often goes undiagnosed and untreated in older adults, and they may feel reluctant to seek help. Symptoms of depression may be different or less obvious in older adults, such as:

  • Memory difficulties or personality changes

  • Physical aches or pain

  • Fatigue, loss of appetite, sleep problems or loss of interest in sex — not caused by a medical condition or medication

  • Often wanting to stay at home, rather than going out to socialize or doing new things

  • Suicidal thinking or feelings, especially in older men

Not everyone who is depressed experiences every symptom. Some people experience only a few symptoms while others may experience many. Several persistent symptoms in addition to low mood are required for a diagnosis of major depression, but people with only a few – but distressing – symptoms may benefit from treatment of their “subsyndromal” depression. The severity and frequency of symptoms and how long they last will vary depending on the individual and his or her particular illness. Symptoms may also vary depending on the stage of the illness.


Risk Factors

Depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the U.S. Current research suggests that depression is caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors.

Depression can happen at any age but often begins in adulthood. Depression is now recognized as occurring in children and adolescents, although it sometimes presents with more prominent irritability than low mood. Many chronic mood and anxiety disorders in adults begin as high levels of anxiety in children.

Depression, especially in midlife or older adults, can co-occur with other serious medical illnesses, such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, and Parkinson’s disease. These conditions are often worse when depression is present. Sometimes medications taken for these physical illnesses may cause side effects that contribute to depression. A doctor experienced in treating these complicated illnesses can help work out the best treatment strategy.

Risk factors include:

  • Personal or family history of depression

  • Major life changes, trauma, or stress

  • Certain physical illnesses and medications

When to see a doctor

If you feel depressed, make an appointment to see your doctor or mental health professional as soon as you can. If you're reluctant to seek treatment, talk to a friend or loved one, any health care professional, a faith leader, or someone else you trust.


When to get emergency help

If you think you may hurt yourself or attempt suicide, call 911 or your local emergency number immediately.


Also, consider these options if you're having suicidal thoughts:

  • Call 2-1-1 for children in crisis

  • Call your doctor or mental health professional.

  • Call a suicide hotline number — in the U.S., call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255). Use that same number and press "1" to reach the Veterans Crisis Line.

  • Reach out to a close friend or loved one.

  • Contact a minister, spiritual leader, or someone else in your faith community.

If you have a loved one who is in danger of suicide or has made a suicide attempt, make sure someone stays with that person. Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately. Or, if you think you can do so safely, take the person to the nearest hospital emergency room.

TIMES ARE CHALLENGING. WE CAN HELP.

If you or a loved one are struggling with depression or anxiety, Wellmore can help. We offer an array of outpatient and intensive in-home programs for children, adolescents, and adults to treat depression, anxiety as well as other behavioral health issues.


Our treatment team includes licensed addiction counselors, clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, psychiatrists, and other treatment specialists who employ person-centered approaches to depression and anxiety, and strategies for addressing specific needs.


Call us at 203-756-7287 (Children & Adolescents), 203-755-1143 (Adults), or visit www.wellmore.org for more information about depression and anxiety treatment. Telehealth and telephonic services offered,

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141 East Main Street, Waterbury, CT 06702

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